Dave Parise over rotaties & buikspieren

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SheRu
Go John Henry!
2012/04/23 08:44:11 (permalink)
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Dave Parise over rotaties & buikspieren

http://blog.ideafit.com/blogs/dave-parise/what-we-see-what-we-hear-is-what-we-do-ab-a-dab-a-dont
 
Isolated rotations seem to be one of the most popular exercises in the gym. What are people thinking of when they are doing isolated rotations? They are all thinking spot reduction.
 
This is what the manufacturers of the products or machine companies want you to think. Then we go ahead and mimic the movement by doing rotations with a broomstick, or side bends with a dumbbell or 25lb plate. Now that the medicine ball has been re-introduced in the fitness industry we have clients doing seated ‘disk grinder” rotations. How many degrees of rotation does the lumbar spine have in a “fixed” position? Moreover to make matters worse a trainer takes the client over to the declined ab-bench connects their clients feet, as they grind and twist side to side. This is just another form of “perception” a new cool move to sell a medicine ball, or to alleviate boredom in a routine. Unfortunately it is a great way to add a host of orthopedic concerns over time. Remember there is no such thing as spot reduction. You cannot reduce inches or burn fat in any area by working that area. Think of this when your shaving your legs, or face. When you cut yourself do you say, “Oh, man -- chin blood,” or “leg blood?” Fat is like blood; it is systemic. So moving the body in specific ways does not justify a reduction in girth, or inches. Also people doing stick twists, side bends with weights are in what we call a “tension under time block” thirty to ninety seconds is the goal of maximum hypertrophy (muscle building). I ask you this, think about this intuitively: Who wants to build a blocky waist? As a personal trainer did any client walk into a gym and ask to build his or her obliques? On a scientific level, when we talk about the microanatomy of muscle, and all the specific finite functions, ninety-two percent of the people out there have a deranged disk. Under safe micro-progressions it will strengthen, but you better not do a rotation with a client if that client has not progressed over time to do it. Did you know the lumbar spine only has three to four degrees of rotation? When you rotate with a stick, or lock your feet in an ab bench while twisting with a medicine ball, you are putting a tremendous amount of stress and strain and a host of crummy forces across the disks (scientific word “crummy) the last thing we want is to provide the straw that broke the camel’s back. I don’t recommend this if you want to remain an injury-free trainer (and this is my professional opinion): I personally omit rotations from my toolbox of exercises. There are reasons to do rotations and specific articulations / movements that are close to human function. However for the safety of my clients we do not do fixed rotations. I coined the term “disk grinder.” I find most fixed environments that twist and rotate the spine are nothing more then a way to increase accumulative stress in the lumbar region. Exercises like the above are just more reasons to market a product. I personally love medicine ball training. However…I would never fix anyone to the ground, or rotate him or her in a seated position. We must not dictate a range of motion by becoming fixed or connected to the ground or chair.
 
Dave Parise
 
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